Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing – Federal

General Information
Program/Project Name: Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing – Federal

Funding Category: Serving the Most Vulnerable

Program Description
Federal Grant Name: Federal Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program

Programs Supported Through Funding:
HPRP funds in the first year will be distributed as follows:

– Provide financial assistance to households that would be homeless but for assistance

– Assist households currently living in emergency or transitional housing move into permanent  housing

– Diverting households from emergency housing

– Develop data collection and reporting procedures for housing counseling.

Why Apply for this Grant?
The Office of Supportive Housing is re-tooling the “front door” to Emergency Housing by screening all households at intake for eligibility for prevention services.  Prevention services will be available at community sites in order to provide a safety net for households on the brink of homelessness.  Rapid Re-Housing Providers accept referrals from Emergency, Transitional, Department of Behavioral health and other homeless providers within the homeless continuum of care to open the “back door” out of homelessness and thereby reduce the number of households in Emergency Housing.

Program Objectives
Use of Funds:
For the first year of funding:

– Provide prevention services to 1050 households

– Place 500 households currently residing in emergency or transitional housing into permanent housing

– Households that receive prevention assistance will remain housed in the community for a minimum of 12 months post assistance.

– Households that receive diversion assistance will remain housed in the community for a minimum of 6 months post assistance.

– Reduce the Emergency Housing census by 5%.

Grant Achievements for the Quarter: This quarter, the Prevention Providers provided $388,217.25 in financial assistance to 211 households.  The Rapid Re-Housing Providers provided $797,069.74 in financial assistance to 637 households to help them move from emergency and transitional housing and stabilize in permanent housing, and an additional 46 households are in the process of being assessed and placed in permanent housing.   The Office of Supportive Housing has conducted site visits to each of the provider agencies and held monthly meetings for the Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing providers to discuss HUD requirements, share resources, and provide HMIS training.   In September, the Office of Supportive Housing hosted a Resource Fair  for HPRP staff and consumers that included 21 workshops on topics related to self-sufficiency, including: budgeting, repairing bad credit, preparing resumes, interviewing skills, adult education, utility plans, and self-weatherization.

Actual # of FTE jobs created for the quarter*:

Q8: 53.36

Q9: 59.83

Q10: 48.36

*In the City of Philadelphia’s quarterly federal report, also know as Section 1512 reports, jobs are calculated based on hours worked, instead of the number of people at work. It also looks only at jobs funded directly by the Recovery Act, and does not include jobs created indirectly. Direct jobs are counted quarterly and are not cumulative.

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